Hieracium crepidispermum Fries (redirected from: Hieracium lemmonii)
Family: Asteraceae
Lemmon's Hawkweed
[Hieracium lemmonii A. Gray,  more]
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Robert Sivinski  
Plants 25-45(-100) cm. Stems proximally piloso-hirsute (hairs 3-6+ mm), distally piloso-hirsute (hairs 1-2+ mm) and stellate-pubescent. Leaves: basal 2-8+, cauline (0-)3-4+; blades elliptic to oblanceolate, 30-85 × 16-35 mm, lengths 2.5-5+ times widths, bases cuneate (basal) or clasping (cauline), margins entire or denticulate, apices obtuse to acute, faces piloso-hirsute (hairs 1-2+ mm). Heads 8-12(-25+) in ± paniculiform arrays. Peduncles stellate-pubescent. Calyculi: bractlets 9-12+. Involucres campanulate, 7-9+ mm. Phyllaries 13-18+, apices ± rounded to acute, abaxial faces stellate-pubescent. Florets 25-40; corollas whitish to pale yellow, 8-9 mm. Cypselae urceolate, 3.5-4.5 mm; pappi of 45-60+, white or stramineous bristles in 2+ series, 5-5.5+ mm. Flowering Sep. Springy sites, along streams; 2200-2500 m; Ariz., N.Mex.; Mexico.
Kearney and Peebles 1969, Vascular Plants of the Gila Wilderness; (http://www.wnmu.edu)
Duration: Perennial Nativity: Native Lifeform: Forb/Herb General: Herbaceous perennials to 60 cm tall, herbage copiously to densely hirsute, at least below, stems leafy. Leaves: Alternate, oblong, somewhat broad with a clasping base, margins roughly denticulate, at least remotely, copiously to densely hirsute. Flowers: Heads small, the corollas yellow, involucres 8-12 mm, phyllaries equal, acuminate, stipitate-glandular, involucres and peduncles copiously to densely long hirsute, inflorescences borne singly or few in corymbiform to paniculiform arrays. Fruits: Achenes columnar, not tapering, ribbed. Pappus of brownish or white capillary bristles. Ecology: Found in moist areas in Ponderosa pine forests, from 7,000-8,000 ft (2134-2438 m); flowering July-October. Distribution: Arizona, New Mexico. Notes: Look for this species under Hieracium Lemmoni in older texts. Good identifiers for this species are the densely long-hirsute stems, the denticulate leaves (at least remotely), and the glabrous to stipitate glandular involucres 8-12 mm high. Ethnobotany: There is no specific use recorded for this species, but the genus was used to treat mouth sores, consumption, and chewed for pleasure. Etymology: Hieracium comes from the Greek hierax, a hawk, while crepidispermum comes from the Greek krepis a sandal and spermum for seed, or seed like the genus Crepis. Synonyms: Hieracium lemmonii Editor: LCrumbacher 2011
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Robert Sivinski  
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Stephen Hale  
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Hieracium crepidispermum image
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Hieracium crepidispermum image
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Hieracium crepidispermum image
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Hieracium crepidispermum image
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Hieracium crepidispermum image
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Hieracium crepidispermum image
Hieracium crepidispermum image